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Javascript for Java (ie JVM)

One of the exciting developments in the recent JDK-8 release is the integration of the Nashorn Javascript engine.

Vertically integrated Javascript web application development

Nashorn allows for the development of applications in the Javascript language on the JVM, what this means in general is that you can build both the frontend and backend of web applications in the same language, ie Javascript.


What's in it for you

Vertically integrated Javascript development has great appeal as can be attested to by the popularity of NodeJS. For the JVM this offers massive opportunity. Currently a lot of businesses with JVM infrastructure are constrained by their inability to staff for their Java developer needs. With technology such as Nashorn, a JVM shop doesn't need to demand Java skills, instead as a JVM shop you can hire developers already skilled in Javascript and put them to work building your business applications while still taking full advantage of the massive JVM technology platform.


What HiveMind offers

What HiveMind has to offer is a ready to use web app platform for making full use of Nashorn. Currently if you want to use Nashorn without a platform like HiveMind, you'll either have to manually integrate it into an existing Java application or use it as an ordinary scripting facility. What HiveMind does however is allow a developer to use Nashorn as a fully functional web app solution by means of a middleware that wraps around the Nashorn engine. HiveMind is so far the easiest way to do vertically integrated Javascript web application development on the JVM.

Note
HiveMind ships with Mozilla Rhino Javascript engine, if you are running JDK-8 then using Nashorn is a trivial matter.

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